Living Consciously

My idea of being ‘conscious’, as Eckhart Tolle describes it, is to live aware. Aware of our animal impulses, our thoughts, emotions, perceptions, our made-up stories of ‘reality’, even our made up ‘self’. Once conscious, we can resist the collective human, made-up and currently dysfunctional way of being. If for instance we witness the unsustainable consumption of resources, we can as an example to others, live our life sustainably.

We can even choose to which degree, for practical purposes, we superficially act to ‘fit in’ (many folks we encounter daily are not ready for a fully conscious being—best to only shake their world in stages).

I’ll close with a quote attributed to Mahatma Gandhi,
“To believe in something, and not to live it, is dishonest.”

Positive Constructs of the Mind

Is it possible to witness melancholy from afar?

From the perspective of what Eastern philosophers call ‘the silent witness’, ‘the true Self’, that self shared with all creation, Universe, ‘God’ to some, what never changes and is infinite—even if this may be no more than a construct of the mind—is that not better than a pill? If a construct of the mind gets one through life and kills the gloom without suicide or having your plans and action sucked away* by the feel-good, ‘everything’s okay’ of alcohol—is that not a superior path through this physical life?

Our moods swing to the mix of our brain chemicals, and this, orchestrated by that evil, spiral molecule who thinks he has our best interest in mind, so what, if to a degree, we can short circuit him and feel okay for a change?

*Not pointing fingers—two-drinks-a-day got me through many a rough patch (one twenty years long) but read what Nietzsche had to say about alcohol or watch the movie “The Iceman Cometh” for a different perspective.

Photo – Yakusugiland, Yakushima, Japan

FEELING BAD

Feeling Bad—the concept struck me as odd yesterday (a migraine day). An unfortunate external event is one thing, but feeling bad over it is our own act. We whip our minds in an endless frenzy of directionally unique judgments. There is a reason the enlightened ones suggest staying present and accepting without judgement. 

Meditating Nietzsche

Until we . . .
evolve beyond our competition-based society
circumvent biology’s depression-inducing reward-mechanism
blend with machines or upgrade the one in our heads
upload our consciousnesses to explore other dimensions and worlds,

We might meld the philosophies of Siddhartha Gautama and Nietzsche to . . .
express our Will without attachment to outcomes
fully accept the present moment
be mindful of the mind-sullying whispers of DNA’s anger merchants

When acts of Will don’t produce the desired result
Accept that and craft plans new

Rather than crushing Will’s desire
Consider desire worthy of action
Yet transitory
Not worthy of attachment
Not worthy of pain

By Ivor Peter Brians